Our Brand Suitcase

Last Updated June 4, 2021

Core Messaging

Outlined here are the foundational messages that keep your company rooted and standing tall.

Brand Essence

Abrasive Products for Wood and Concrete Floor Refinishing.

Brand Promise

Concierge-level customer service, affordable investments and superior product performance.

Position

As a smaller company, we are more nimble than our competitors and our customer care team provides a personal touch.

Voice and Tone

Real. Rugged. Ready. It really says what we are: a durable product that is ready when you need it.

Voice and Tone

  • Friendly
    Casual
    Approachable
    Smart
    Empathetic
    Competent

Terminology

Follow these rules to ensure your brand is talked about in a consistent manner.

Our Name

Always refer to Virginia Abrasives using the full name.

Never use VA or any other acronyms when referencing Virginia Abrasives.

Elevator Pitch

We are one of only five companies in the US producing sandpaper abrasives. We are a premier brand serving the rental industry and a growing brand in the professional wood flooring industry.

Example Headlines

Monster Sanding Abrasives are Engineered for Professional Flooring.

Abrasives Made for the Toughest Jobs.

Terrifyingly Good.

The Right Start to a Great Finish.

Tried and trusted for over 50 years.

Built tough. Just like you.

Logo

Logos are key brand identifiers — that is why it is imperative that ours is always placed consistently.

Basics

To ensure maximum contrast and visibility, follow these rules:

On dark backgrounds, use logos with a red “Virginia Abrasives.”

On medium-contrast backgrounds, use logos with a white “Virginia Abrasives.”

On light backgrounds, use logos with a red “Virginia Abrasives.”

Clear Space and Minimum Sizes

Your logo should always be placed consistently so that it is easy to find. Start by ensuring appropriate space around the logo–it should never be lost amongst other logos or graphics. Following these minimum clear space guidelines will ensure clarity and legibility of your mark.

Keep at least an A’s worth of negative space between the logo and other elements.

Never use the logo at dimensions smaller than the specified minimum size.

Logo Clear Space 

Minimum Sizes

Placement

The Virginia Abrasives logo should either appear in the center of a piece or in one of its four corners.

Corner Placement

Central Placement

Logo Don'ts

Only use the approved and provided logos. These can be downloaded in Asset Downloads. Never alter the logo files. Do not add shadows, patterns, intricate backgrounds, or other effects.

Don’t change the color of the logo.

Don’t rotate the logo.

Don’t distort the logo.

Don’t re-typeset the logo.

Don’t place on a background with insufficient contrast.

Don’t create additional lock-ups.

Background Contrast

Selecting which version of your logo to use can be tricky. Use this spectrum to help you decide which will provide the most contrast. Some trial and error may be necessary.

Contrast spectrum

Background examples

Color

When creating or printing a piece, be sure to double check the colors you are using. Remember, different mediums require different color values, color proportions matter, and some colors are used for specific types of content only.

Basics

Red, gold and charcoal should account for the majority of a given brand application. The imperial red, navy blue, maroon, yellow, turquoise, and purple are supplemental colors.

Swatches

Color consistency across all brand materials is key. Here’s what you need to know.

Use Pantone values when color consistency is imperative. Use coated (C) values for glossy paper and uncoated (U) values for matte paper.

Use CMYK values for typical printing. CMYK is often more economical than Pantone, but can be less consistent across printing processes.

Use RGB & Hex values for digital use like websites, screens and projection.

Red

Pantone

200U
199C

CMYK

00 100 72 00

RGB

213 00 50

Hex

#d50032

Gold

Pantone

7402U
7402C

CMYK

08 13 50 00

RGB

236 216 155

Hex

#ecd89b

Charcoal

Pantone

447U
446C

CMYK

00 00 00 90

RGB

63 68 68

Hex

#3f4444

Show Tint Values
  • PantoneTint50% Tint

    CMYK40 33 33 00

    RGB159 159 160

    Hex#9f9fa0

  • PantoneTint5% Tint

    CMYK04 02 03 00

    RGB241 242 242

    Hex#f1f2f2

Maroon

Pantone

7421C

CMYK

33 100 64 39

RGB

120 0 50

Hex

#780032

Imperial Red

Pantone

CMYK

00 87 80 00

RGB

240 73 62

Hex

#f0493e

Orange

Pantone

157C

CMYK

0 67 99 0

RGB

244 117 33

Hex

#f47521

Yellow

Pantone

144C

CMYK

0 48 98 0

RGB

248 151 29

Hex

#f8971d

Turquoise

Pantone

321C

CMYK

84 28 37 2

RGB

0 140 153

Hex

#008c99

Navy Blue

Pantone

282C

CMYK

100 89 34 25

RGB

0 45 98

Hex

#002d62

Purple

Pantone

260C

CMYK

66 100 22 9

RGB

113 20 113

Hex

#711471

Color Proportions

Use the specified values to ensure color consistency across all branded materials. Some colors are meant to be used more sparingly than others. The chart below shows the color relationships in a given brand application. These percentages are not compulsory, they are only provided to give a general idea of recommended proportions.

Typography

The fonts we use and the way we place our content helps our customers and employees sort through information. Adhering to our typography rules will make it easier for people to understand our messages and find what they are looking for.

Basics

Knockout and Interstate are the typefaces that should be used on all materials from business cards to signage.

Knockout is a sans-serif typeface designed by Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones. Its supercondensed letterforms harken back to nineteenth century American wood type and convey a sense of ruggedness and confidence.

Interstate is a typeface designed by Frere-Jones. The design of Interstate was based on the letters found on US highway signs. In addition to complimenting the American flavor of Knockout, Interstate’s clear legibility at a distance and clearly-differentiated letterforms make it an natural choice for body text.

 

Primary Headline Typeface

Knockout Full Bantamweight—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Secondary Headline Typeface

Knockout Welterweight—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Tertiary Headline Typeface

Interstate Bold Condensed—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Body Typeface

Interstate Regular—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Body Typeface Condensed

Interstate Regular Condensed—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Type Hierarchy

The size of your font will vary across applications, but here are some general rules:

Primary headlines are best set at 54pt or larger. They should be noticeably bigger than body text. Primary headlines will be the largest text in a composition. They should be short and important. All headlines should be formatted in all uppercase.

Secondary headlines are typically set in red. They should be noticeably smaller than primary headlines, and noticeably larger than tertiary headlines. All headlines should be formatted in all uppercase.

Tertiary headlines should be noticeably smaller than secondary headlines, and noticeably larger than body text. All headlines should be formatted in all uppercase.

Body text is best set between 7pt and 19pt, with care given to legibility. There should be a generous amount of spacing between each of the lines (also known as leading) for easy legibility. Body text should be noticeably smaller than the headlines.

Body text condensed should be set in the same way as body text. Use body text condensed when space is an issue.

Lists should be set in the same way as body text.

Sample Settings

Our Websafe Typefaces

There are some limitations when it comes to applying your brand typefaces to HTML applications like email.

Whenever you are unable to use Knockout or Interstate Bold Condensed for headlines, use Arial. Arial can also be used in place of Interstate Regular and Interstate Regular Condesnsed for body text and lists.

Websafe typeface

Arial—AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
0123456789.,;:(?&@$#)\

Download font files

Primary headlines

Primary headlines only occur once in a given composition. They are typically centered and white, appearing over a hero image. 

Always make sure there is a sufficient amount of contrast off of the background.

 

Primary headline example

Table formatting

Use the following as a reference when formatting tables.

Table example

Graphic Elements

These are unique design elements that add flavor and personality to our brand, making us recognizable and memorable. Pay close attention to each asset as they often have different rules for placement.

The layout grid

Use a grid to organize content clearly, making alignments based off its columns.

 

Layout grid example

The Corner

The Corner is one of our defining graphic elements. Here are some things to keep in mind.

The Corner always exists in the upper left. Its diagonal is always 45˚.

The Primary Corner is Imperial Red and Red.

The Primary Corner only occurs once in an application. It is always used in concert with a hero image. Sometimes a clipping mask is used to place the Primary Corner behind elements of the hero image.

The Secondary Corner is Light Grey. It is used in supporting contexts like interior pages, or when space does not allow for the Primary Corner.

Primary corner anatomy

Primary corner example 1

Primary corner example 2

Secondary corner example 1

Secondary corner example 2

Download File

Hero image

The hero image is a gold-toned photograph with a strong focal point. It is used in primary and introductory contexts like title slides, catalog covers, or the top of a web page.

It occurs once in an application.

Sometimes parts of the hero image are darkened to create enough contrast for text or other graphics to be placed on top.

To turn a photograph into a hero image, follow the steps below.

Hero image anatomy

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Completed hero image

Call to action

A call to action is a short imperative that encourages the reader or user to take an action. Indicating call to actions consistently will help guide your audience through materials.

Calls to action always are placed in the lower right.

They consist of white type contained in a red trapezoid.

Call to action anatomy

Call to action example 1

Call to action example 1

Download File

Buttons

Buttons are used in digital contexts. They allow users to take an action.

Buttons are always stroked in orange.

They always terminate with a white arrow that is contained in an orange trapezoid.

Button anatomy

Button example

Applications

Here’s our visual style in action. In these applications you will be able to see how all of our assets work together to create a cohesive and well positioned brand. When creating new applications, compare them with these examples to ensure they fit in seamlessly.

Physical Applications

Brochure Cover

Poster

Flyer

Digital Applications

Digital Ad

Asset Downloads

Whether it is your first time reviewing this Brand Suitcase or the 132nd, it is always smart to revisit the rules and recommendations for the specific files you are downloading. Keep in mind, this platform will continually be updated as the brand progresses — so be sure to check back with each new project.